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  • Posts Tagged ‘saving’

    America Saves Week: Talking about Saving Helps You Save

    Thursday, March 1st, 2018

    America Saves Week (February 26 – March 3, 2017) is an annual opportunity for individuals to assess their savings and take financial action. Each year, WISER and other organizations across the country encourage savers – or potential savers –to set a goal, make a plan, and save automatically.

    At WISER, it’s almost like every week is America Saves Week– we’ve made it our mission to encourage women to be financially independent and prioritize saving for their long-term future. But on this week in particular, organizations across the country emphasize the importance of financial planning. We share ideas and support and encourage each other– an event that mirrors something that’s important for you to do, in your own financial life: talk about savings with your friends. Although it can be sometimes seen as impolite or taboo, talking about money, and more specifically long-term saving, can help you achieve your financial goals. Here’s why:

    1. It holds you accountable.

    There’s nothing like outside observation to help us accomplish our goals, no matter what they may be. When we’re only accountable to ourselves, it’s easy to let things slip or not try as hard, but when someone else is in on the plan, the pressure is on! Tell your friends about the specific goals you have this month when it comes to saving– say, cooking dinner at home more than going out in order to save cash. Post pictures on social media of your meals! The positive encouragement from friends will motivate you, and when making the decision in the future about whether to eat at home or at a restaurant, eating at home will seem even more appealing. Talking to your friends about your savings goals will hold you accountable, too, because it will mean that there will be someone to remind you of your plan when you’re thinking of abandoning it.

    2. You friends may give you great ideas.

    People often don’t talk about their savings goals, so you never know who similarly may be taking smart steps towards their retirement like you. If you share your goals with others, you may learn that they too are on the same path, and can offer you great advice on how to get there.

    3. It helps others.

    In the same way that you may not know that your friends and family are taking smart steps toward saving, you also may not know how others in your life are struggling with their finances. If you talk to them about the steps you are taking to save– and why it is important to do so– it may motivate them to move forward in a similar way in their own lives. Sometimes all it takes is a little extra encouragement to get the ball rolling!

    There are many other reasons why it’s a great idea to talk about your savings goals with your friends and family. America Saves Week, in particular, is an opportunity for individuals to assess their own saving status. WISER is proud to be a partner in this annual campaign. Take the America Saves Pledge and join the #ImSavingForSweepstakes that asks savers to inspire friends and family to save by sharing their goal or savings story on social media. You could win up to $750 toward that goal.

    Visit America Saves for more savings tips and information, and check out WISER’s resources to help you save and plan for a more financially secure future.

     

    Here’s Why Financial Literacy Is For Everyone

    Thursday, April 20th, 2017

    little blog pictureApril is Financial Literacy Month.

    “Financial Literacy” is a somewhat new term and trend in the United States, and for that reason, some find it off-putting and discouraging. Don’t let the fancy phrasing scare you, though. The reality is, financial literacy simply means knowledge about money and savings. Even though most of us didn’t learn the basics of financial knowledge in an educational setting (hopefully that will change in the future!), important, life-changing saving information is easily within reach.

    In fact, understanding of the importance of financially literacy only became widespread in the past fifteen years or so. In 2002, the U.S. Department of Treasury created the Office of Financial Education as a way to organize its efforts in the area. The next year, Congress passed the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions (FACT) Act, which established the Financial Literacy and Education Commission, a group that later published a “National Strategy on Financial Literacy.”

    That means that, hopefully, financial education will become a standard and required part of education. However, just because it wasn’t something you learned about in school doesn’t mean you cannot become extremely knowledgeable on investing, saving, retirement and other financial topics. It is important for everyone to educate themselves about their finances, but know that you don’t need to be a financial expert to make smart decisions. Some basic information can go a long way.

    In particular, it is important to know what you should be doing at every stage of life to make sure you are on track financially and preparing for long term financial security. WISER’s “7 Life Defining Financial Decisions” booklet breaks down key topics into stages and explains how to approach each one.

    For example, when it comes to jobs and careers, when taking a job, consider not only salary but also benefits. There are two basic kinds of employer-sponsored pension plans: defined benefit and defined contribution plans. When leaving a job, it is important to consider that changing jobs, even for higher pay, can cost you a bundle in lost benefits and retirement income. If at some point in your life you decide to stay home full time, think through the family finances, including retirement planning. Where there are large upsides, you will lose compensation, benefits, job skills and contacts if you leave work completely.

    The booklet offers more advice on financial decision-making at every stage of life. By focusing on life stages and basic information, financial literacy is within reach for everyone.

    Why Saving As A Young Person Is Important

    Thursday, March 23rd, 2017

    “Live while you’re young!” “Youth is wasted on the young!” “I’ll sleep when I’m dead!” “Live in the moment!”

    Everywhere they turn, young people are inundated with messages encouraging them to live now, worry later. In financial terms, that translates to “spend now, save later”—and it’s a hard message to ignore. The internal justifications to spend instead of save often sound like this: all of my friends are planning an expensive trip overseas, why shouldn’t I join them? Why not rack up credit card debt—I’ll be able to pay it off later, when I’m older and have a higher paying job! I’m only young once!

    The same mentality leads to young people to taking out large amounts of student loans, beyond what they may be able to afford or what may be worthwhile. According to new research from the National Endowment for Financial Education, more than 70% of millennials (people ages 23 to 35) have at least one long-term debt, which could be student loans or something else, like a car loan. About 34% of millennials have two long-term loans. These numbers alone are troubling, but to make matters even worse, the research also found that about a quarter of millennials with a retirement account took out a loan or hardship withdrawal in the last 12 months. This emphasizes that many young people are prioritizing the present much more than the future when it comes to finances.

    This trend is putting young people at a serious financial disadvantage—making it more difficult to purchase a home, open a business, or pursue other ventures later in life. Here are several additional reasons why saving as a young person is important:

    Financial Habits Are Set When You’re Young

    The same holds true for any habit: the earlier you adopt it and the more often you carry it out, the more likely it is to stick. Being smart with money is no different. If you are careless about money for most of your life, it will be extremely difficult to switch gears and become a scrupulous saver once there is truly something to save for—like a child or a home. The inverse is also true. If you are smart with money from a young age and put in place good habits, like putting a certain amount of your paycheck each month into savings, you are likely to carry those habits later in life.

    Saving a Little Now Equals A Lot Once You Retire

    We often hear about “the power of compound interest.” We,ll that power is only powerful if you start saving young. The more years that go by, the more powerful compound interest becomes. If you save a little bit as a young person, that money will accrue interest and, by the time it’s time to retire 30 or so years later, a little bit of money will have grown into a lot of money. You can only take advantage of this is if you save early.

    Cost of Living Grows As You Age

     It’s easy to assume that because you can support yourself now, you’ll be able to do so later. However, the cost of living grows dramatically as you age. The odds increase that you will become a caregiver, in terms of both finances and time, for an aging parent or a child. Medical costs also increase as you age. Your salary will also likely grow, but it may not grow enough to support these costs, let alone enough to put aside enough for retirement, when your income will decrease dramatically. Saving early helps ensure financial stability throughout your entire life.

    WISER

    About Us

    WISER is a nonprofit organization that works to help women, educators and policymakers understand the important issues surrounding women's retirement income. WISER creates a variety of consumer publications including fact sheets, booklets and a quarterly newsletter that explain in easy-to-understand language the complex issues surrounding Social Security, divorce, pay equity, pensions, savings and investments, banking, home-ownership, long-term care and disability insurance.

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